Working as a Freelancer on Fiverr.com — Is It Worth Your Time? - Find new gigs - Make Extra Money On The Side

Working as a Freelancer on Fiverr.com — Is It Worth Your Time?

By Gina K.

Within 14 months of my full-time marketing job, I decided it was time to start diversifying my sources of income and experiment with different ways to earn money. I had read in several places that Fiverr.com was a reliable option for writers to consider, so I decided to check it out. In October 2018, I created a profile and became a living member of the Fiverr community.

I noticed that writing and translation was a core category on the platform, which was in line with what I wanted to offer. My area of expertise is in the field of articles and blogs and after a few days of browsing the pages of other sellers to see what works and what doesn’t work, I created my first gig.

?cid=4945976 - Find new gigs - Make Extra Money On The Side

How does Fiverr work?

For those who don’t know, Fiverr.com is a marketplace that connects independent freelancers (sellers) with clients looking for specific services (buyers). There are many categories that your work can fall under, from financial consulting to logo design.

To earn money, you must create “gigs,” which are mostly a mini sales pitch that tries to attract potential buyers to buy your services.

Started out as Contributing Writer

Clients found me, but the requirements were too long, and the pay was next to nothing.

However, I wanted the experience, I wasn’t making money as a writer, and I was still working part-time at my nine to five, so I did the job inadvertently.

I wrote articles on a lot of topics ranging from travel and success to “The 4 Best Cat Foods to Buy”. I will never forget that one!

I was paid between $5 and $10 per article, and the articles had between 500 and 1000 words. They were pennies, but I was grateful that they paid me something without working a job.

I kept writing on Fiverr, and in nine months, I made $958. I averaged around $100 a month.

I was grateful, but I wanted more. I deserved more because I knew my writing skills were excellent! So, I closed my account.

My experience earning more than $2,000 per month

After I decided enough was enough, I started looking for my first real clients; on my own, without using a content factory or a bidding site.

As with anything, there is no one recipe for success on Fiverr. I can’t give you a step-by-step guide to make 2k per month or build a funnel of reliable clients.

What I can provide are my experiences and (hopefully) ideas to help you decide whether or not Fiverr is a solid stream of income for you to consider. This is what I learned from Fiverr:

?cid=4945976 - Find new gigs - Make Extra Money On The Side

Reviews are golden

People give up on Fiverr quickly because there are so many people already offering what you probably want to provide.

Okay, there are millions of people using Fiverr; you don’t have to be the only one offering to write a blog post for a business!

What I did is rise to the top by getting great reviews. I ask for reviews and go out of my way to deliver fantastic customer service.

Invest time in advance

I built an excellent reputation quickly because I offered something too cheap and got a lot of orders. This wasn’t great for me right now because I was flooded with work for $5-10 each, but I got a long list of clients under my belt, and my gigs started to rank highly on searches. Then I could raise my prices.

I offer something quick and simple

I first offered to write blog posts for small businesses. Writing blog posts for someone you have never met before and who operates a company you have never heard of can be difficult.

I offer business name creation (research and brainstorm, and provide them with a list of options), tagline creation, and ideas for articles they can write on their blog.

These are pretty simple things, I love to do, and they complete quickly.

Verdict:

Fiverr is not like Uber, where the matches are random, and the driver has a certain level of income security. Nothing is guaranteed.

If you are willing to do a lot of work for little pay and learn how to position yourself on the platform, then you may end up doing very well.

Fiverr will not make you rich. You will likely find that you are doing a lot of work for little return. If you’re like me and want to become a copywriter, this is an excellent place to test the waters and get some work for your portfolio. If you’re serious, you’re likely to outgrow Fiverr as you develop your skills, but it’s not a bad place to start.